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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
's going to happen in denver. remind them of the big thompson flood or any time we have blizzards. people in florida during the hurricanes. despite the effort of florida power britney and crews from all over the country to turn the power back on, people and fun were still without power for six weeks. that's not bad today. think about august, september, in d.c. your apartment, your home, your condo, your office, or ever is, no power for six weeks. i don't want to be around you guys. you'll be nuts. you'll be irritable, pain in the rear, some of you might go off the deep end, start shooting or whenever. there is a very thin line between this technologically savvy society that we have today and mother nature or man either purposely or accidentally creating a crisis where everything we take for granted is gone. i'm afraid that most of us are deadly indifferent to it. we don't like to think about it. my time in d.c. and fema has made me a pervert in respect because now when i travel i think about how i get back, something happens. at think about we were in wholefoods are someplace. i'm looking
, the social security benefits drop 22%. that's a big hit for folks that are living on social security. so what can we do today, 25 years in advance, what small thing can we do today to social security which will build up the solvency and life of social security for even more years? that's a -- i think that's an honest challenge and we should view it as an honest challenge. not to eliminate social security but to say to the generation of younger workers in america, it's going to be there and you'll be darn lucky that it is there because a lot of seniors today can tell you the story of their lives paying into social security. they now receive the benefits. but what happened to their other plans for retirement? well, that little 401(k), that ira, that s.e.p. plan took a hit a few years ago, lost about 30% of its value. and for many americans with pension plans where their work, some of those companies went out of business and walked away from those pension obligations. social security has been there. we want it to be there in the future. so we can find ways to strengthen social security and give
in transforming themselves, she's one of the big reasons why. please help me in welcoming to the stage, liz schuller. [applause] >> thank you. all right. thank you, barry, for the introduction. and i'd like to think raj for raising the bar. thanks a lot for the rest of us and not those creative messaging tools that we all need to address inequality. i wish i would have heard her before my speech. so why am i here as part of this panel? the whole point of what i want to talk to you today is the power of collective action and how it could counter the rise in inequality and how unions fit into that picture. now, when i think about inequality, especially, as of late, i think about those teachers in wisconsin, construction workers in ohio, nurses in new hampshire, who have been locked out and denied their basic rights to collective bargaining. we've seen what it looks like the state capital in wisconsin and we show you now what's happening in office buildings all across this country. ♪ >> here's to america's workers. when the economy was down, they sacrificed. during tough times when executive
. the court refused to hear the case in 2005 and left miller in jail. that was a big story because everybody had anticipated that the court would clarify and needed to clarify the extent to which reporters are able to protect their confidential sources. but in the miller case it was a disi ponte -- disappointing nondecision, just a refusal to take the case. the only case that the court has ever decided on this issue was another one that i worked on the losing side of, and that was back in 1972 and involved earl caldwell, a reporter for "the new york times" who covered the black panther party. and did all the times' coverage of the black panther or party. the court in the caldwell case decided that reporters had to appear before a grand jury who were investigating something about the, about the black an they are party -- panther party, and the reporters had to testify like any other citizen would have to testify. and reporters had no first amendment protection against compelled disclosure of their sources. even if that meant that the sources would dry up, not cooperate, and that would ruin a
of the big package. we think that estimate was given in 2009 and the authors of the estimate think that its low, and we are very concerned that it's going to be much higher than that and we will continue to get much higher than that. and obviously the collection the states and governments that rely on the revenue, but those folks in those little towns across the country that are trying to make a living selling to the people in their community that have an automatic six to 8% price disadvantage simply because the truck is driving out hundred and of packages is having a devastating effect on small and medium-size retailers. i get we too many telephone calls from the country that are in their view being killed by that price differential. >> he raises the point some of the leading proponents of applying the sales tax online or wal-mart and target national retailers who have also been blamed by small retailers for price pressures and that sort of thing. how would you respond to that? >> they are major proponents of this, but they are not alone. i spend a lot of time talking to the after market a
to think for me. they don't know i'm a little brother who doesn't like it when my big brothers tell me what to do, because they aren't always responsible for their own things. i don't tell my brothers what to do with their money. i'm smarter than they think i am. they should follow the rules." i'd ask that the entire letter be printed at the completion of my speech. and i thank eric -- the presiding officer: without objection. mr. enzi: and i thank him for his sage advice. it is disappointing to be here today dreask the unite addressid states senate on a topic that we should have dealt with months ago. our country is in a financial crisis. erskine bowles, the cochairman of the deficit commission, coined the situation we face as -- quote -- "the most predictable economic crisis in history" -- end quote. and yet there is no clear path forward to deal with both the short-term need to raise the debt limit and the long-term need to get spending under control. i'm disappointed we have made this discussion about the debt ceiling instead of our ever-increasing spending. when you spend beyond your m
think forward to september 11, 2001, all of you know where you were. we were in big sky, montana, preparing a presentation to the national emergency manager. i was the general council at the time, despite from "time" magazine or other things, i came in and worked my way up the ladder at fema. and we got to c130 and flew back here. won't andrews. the next day went over. either that day or the next day win went to the pentagon. it was shortly after having walked in with the search and rescue teams. they have the dogs, if you are a dog lover, meet them. they are wonderful. aren't they? we walked in through the hole in the pentagon and came back out. i forget who it was. somebody was there to greet me to let me know. they wanted to make sure i didn't know about it. a good friend of ours had been on there. we had been with her a week o so before the attacks. all of this is real to me. most of us will go through life and we don't have the personal experience of losing relatives and friends. most of us won't go through life, unless having served, being exposed to the kind of death and d
just outlined three big concerns.riti take us through the translation of what that mightes h mean.n fo what other concerns about places that could be a test of tolerable positions, how do you prepare if quality said, it passively services. >> guest: last l week inha seattle, a case where we had two young men wanting to launch anua attack on military installations near fort lewis in seattle. they were inspired by this by ic in yemen. he was angry at the fact thathe the administration had put him on this hit list. now, the reason that these twots men were stopped is that they went to purchase weapons andeo someone was suspicious and and alerted the authorities. so one of the things l.a. at in. the book is that the future may not be a series of september 11th but a series ofie smaller scale at temps on the united states and hopefully notm successful attempts.u. it is no accident over the last couple of months and if you go on to these websites what they are supporting is the small scale by individual.ale, or indi it is a sign of the disintegration of al qaeda proper, but also a sign that
if your dreams are not big enough and they scare you, then they are not big enough to beat the dreams of dhaka to scare you and we have to dream about when we are really on the team and when we are really on the team we may take one for the team occasionally. only when it is our turn. but if they are not letting us on the team we can't take it anymore, and the fact that this is really serious, this whole thing about social security, about health care, all of this could come unraveled, and these dharma courts the decision and all was that, these are all impacting women and children and all of the cuts are women and children that is not the america that i am a part of. so, when in, people were going to tell you ten reasons they are mad they don't want to go vote, just tell them get mad and go vote. but the real reason to go vote, or you will not believe how bad your next time. thank you for everything you've been doing. thank you. thank you. [applause] [cheering] cheering] "washington journal" continues. host: this is david keating, executive director of the club for growth, which is wh
hey that don't does not very big. it is not very expensive to lift the ball up and get it over that bump and let it keep rolling downhill. i am going to invest or if i'm the person involved i'm going to seek investors and keep growing. there are many many situations though where that just doesn't work. it doesn't work because oh you know it is difficult to get anyone ball and what you have to do is old those that ball. than that is a public public -- anybody can roll down that so it may take many of the situations either a public good to appropriate the value of it or at least partially publicly. we see that all over the place. the human genome products as was it example. every pharmaceutical company that would be a good thing to have the genome but it was not going to be something that they could appropriate enough of to make essentially optimal investment. gps. everybody, maybe could have been smart enough to say if we had all the gps satellites up there i can make rockets and all sorts of things. imagine going out to investor saying i'm going to go do that. whatever you can
question was at the time you guys took the survey, the big concern was unit cohesion disruption. in the process of training, which was having no problems, has there been any indication that separate or different from what we talked about in that survey that once we pass training and pass the repeal and this really starts and open services allowed, they will be unit cohesion coin-operated onto the combat. >> as the service chiefs have received information from their leadership, their change of command to include combat areas over the last six months, there has been no distractions from unit cohesion that have been reported. so it has been very, very positive. the information has come from the leadership in this building. >> the obama administration has said they are no longer appealing challenges to doma. if doma were to fall in a circuit court and only partially, you know, be invalidated for a portion of the country, would you have contingency plans to extend benefits to military families, things like military families in those areas? >> well, and my understanding of the adminis
that submerged that's been debated about too big to fail, there's no point they did. in fact, when the republicans have the hearings on the international competition, two industry witnesses, one representing the bank, orientation, and one house from harvard who's been the supporter of a strong event and industry and skeptical of some regulations and committee both noted that there was a potential competitive disadvantage for large american financial institutions because we are so firm in not allowing bailouts. they noted that america has by far the strongest anti-public participation in bailout law and rules in the world and that this could be a problem for american institutions and others. the argument, bit way, that being designated as a systemically important financial institution is an advantage because you will be able to borrow more cheaply. this is -- we've heard of the gift that keeps on giving -- this is the gift that people keep on refusing. unanimously, any institution there that's discretion about to whether or not it was designated as systemically important has vehemen
are making it more difficult to get there. so i'm a big fan of the navy with one important exception that is on that saturday in november when we play the army-navy football game. >> having gone from the naval academy into the marine corp., i don't watch that game very often. so -- but it does seem to me that we are at tend of another inevitable historical cycle here when we have extended ground combat deployments that expand the size of the active duty army into the marine corp. at the expense very often of what i would call national strategic assets like our operational navy. i think i'm hearing from you that the same thing i heard from secretary panetta that the 313 ship goal for the navy is a reasonable goal. would that be correct? >> well, my ingaugements over the past three months suggest to me that it is. but again, i think we had a conversation a bit earlier about how do we keep strategy at pace with resource decisions. so that comprehensive strategy review that we're doing should it seems to me re-enforce that or cause it to think differently about it. one of the things i th
republicans that signed it, and that's a pretty big number around here, and that's a pretty bipartisan effort around here. and then i began to despair because i didn't feel like we were making progress toward the goal that we all said -- not all of us but many of us said we wanted to get to, and then today we had this conversation with the gang of six who i think presented a plan, as the senator from texas said, that's not perfect and everybody is going to have a disagreement about this piece or that piece but does meet the three-part test by and large that i have come out to the floor and said time and time again i think we ought to meet for the people of colorado, which is who i represent. and what i also know is this, mr. president. at this remarkable time in the country's history, if we act in a way that leads to a downgrade of this country's credit rating, if we the 100 people that are in the united states senate at this moment don't step up to make sure that that doesn't happen, no one is ever going to care what pledge was made about this or that or where we drew the line in the sand. t
companies from this themselves. that's pretty big money. and so anyway, we've got a real problem here and we want to do the right thing and we want to protect people and that's the end of me, so i call upon senator i ought. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank you for holding this important hearing. i know you and your staff with a great deal of time and effort into preparing report the committee released today. i also want to thank those that the federal and state levels was pursued against those perpetrating fraud on consumer satisfaction which recognized the somatic and income attorney general of illinois, with whom i worked with when i was the attorney general of new hampshire and she has been very given this scam an eye out welcome her this morning. from that decade, new hampshire has been responding to the practice commonly known as cramming. when it served as the state's top one person officer ever saw a consumer protection bureau as general madigan does come which included consumer protections were spoken brochures to provide individuals with information about how to protect a
from airports as small as ashville from the airport such as delta county. it's a mixture of big and small airports in best practices in terms what are the kinds of things that are appropriate for each airport. >> all right. again, let me -- i apologize for jumping around. i have a lot of questions in a limited amount of time. you were talking about spending on, for instance, baggage screening equipment. speaking from experience i use at the corpus christi airport. there's three airlines, american continental, regional jets, and southwest with 737's. each individual airline has a screening machine staffed by two tsa agents. we bought three machines for the corpus christi airport, and there's probably a fourth one because delta used to come in there. why couldn't there just be one and a couple tsa agents where there's not that many people there? do we have any clue why we spend multiple -- >> that's a great question. tsa has an electronic baggage screening program to move what they term optimal solutions for each airport. essentially what that means is in many cases they try to re
the pictures of all of the former president's with a very large and big smile with mubarak. they put out a new book, the embassy put out a new book. president obama is on the cover and it shows all of the previous people, republican and democrat, who have been with this administration so a lot of the fault lies. we will see with this find is in this country when these issues are offered because i think there's a lot of blame right here in of river city and by republicans and democrats. the coptic christians and frankly i don't want to see the coptic christians leave egypt. they will not be the middle east and for too long people up here and in the previous administration has been reluctant to advocate for those who are being persecuted because they are christians, whether it be in afghanistan, whether it be in pakistan or in the egypt and all over, the two questions that i have. how many convictions have there been over the last several years? and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? because generally been there is a problem for the members g
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)